Posts Tagged With: refugees

Thinking Power Relations across Humanitarian Geographies: Southism as a Mode of Analysis (January 2019)

https://southernresponses.org/2019/01/23/thinking-power-relations-across-humanitarian-geographies-southism-as-a-mode-of-analysis/amp/?__twitter_impression=true&fbclid=IwAR3ydxsDqrlVN_nKhlKCBaFTOmgRiRMf4Yk4WB94DDzBSPkDpYK8juCywXg

This piece is posted as part of the blog series, Thinking through the Global South.  You can read the series here.

In this blog post Dr Estella Carpi examines the impact of the structural relationships between the Global North and Global South and puts forward the concept of ‘Southism’. This term is used to describe the unequal power relations, practices and belief systems that enable Northern humanitarian actors and organisations to assume a right to care for, rescue and assist Global South settings and people that it preconceives to be disempowered and incapable. Dr Carpi also examines how “epistemic failure”, and “material discrimination” influence and shape the encounters between humanitarian providers and their beneficiaries and suggests a ‘geography-free’ approach to enable us to critically question geographies of birth and national passports as assumed sole identifiers of power.

This piece was posted on the 23rd January, 2019.

By Dr Estella Carpi, Research Associate, Southern Responses to Displacement

In my chapter for the Routledge Handbook of South-South Relations, I sought to uncover the multifaceted power relations that underpin the ways that humanitarian practitioners lead their lives and encounter and think about local residents, governors, infrastructure, providers and refugee groups in the context of Lebanon’s humanitarian crises. My contribution, ‘The “Need to Be There”: North-South Encounters and Imaginations in the Humanitarian Economy’ also seeks to explore how the so-called international community of humanitarian practitioners is perceived by local and refugee populations.

My chapter specifically considers the Lebanese humanitarian provision systems in place during the Israel-Lebanon July 2006 war and in response to the Syrian refugee influx into Lebanon from 2011. In these settings, it can be argued that there is a relationship between aid providers and recipients that cements the Global South as the key source of the Global North’s empowerment, accountability and capability to develop and assist vulnerable settings and people. This is a relationship that I explore in more detail below.

Aiming to problematise ethnic and political geographies within this context of provider-recipient power relations, my chapter suggests the concept of Southism as an analytical tool.  The complex role of international and local aid workers in crisis-driven transnational labour, and the ad hoc relevance of nationality within humanitarian economies, demonstrates to interrelated dynamics: on the one hand, the paternalistic behaviour of the humanitarian apparatus which deems itself as “necessary” in areas of need and, on the other hand, the complex relationships that exist between local, regional and international NGOs. For some displaced people I had the chance to speak to in Lebanon, these provider-recipient power relations seemingly form a homogenous arm of governance unable to either empathize with them or enact solidarity. It is in this articulated context that I explore North-South actual encounters and perceptions within the humanitarian economy.

My field research in Lebanon between 2011 and 2013 pointed to a tension between the philanthropic spirit of the humanitarian system, and local and refugee responses to the “Southist” intent. This Southist intent of the Northern humanitarian system to care for, rescue, upgrade and assist settings in the Global South combines personal affection and collective compassion with professional aspirations. By using the concept of Southism, I intend to resonate with Gayatri Spivak’s “monumentalization of the margins”, that is the overemphasis of needs and areas of need exclusively in the Global South. As such, Southism indicates a structural relationship, rather than a mere act of assisting the South with a philanthropic spirit. Specifically, it preconceives the South as disempowered and incapable.

To examine these concepts further, in my chapter I identify “epistemic failure” and “material discrimination” as key issues that influence and shape the encounters between humanitarian providers and their beneficiaries, and the latter’s perceptions of the former. Epistemic failure, or the failure of the humanitarian system to accumulate local knowledge concerning the cultures, languages and capacities of the areas of intervention exists at the same time as valuing the geographic diversification of professional experience and the standardization of operational skills. This creates a problematic disconnection between humanitarian practices and lifestyles on the one hand and aid recipients on the other.

In turn, material discrimination refers to the different pay-scales set up for local and international staff, heavily disadvantaging the former. In addition, I propose that “humanitarian tourism”, “politics of blame” and the “betrayal of the international community” represent local and refugee perceptions of global humanitarian worldviews, ways of being and lifestyles. “Humanitarian tourism’ represents the temporary as well as voyeuristic international interest in crisis-stricken settings. There is also a humanitarian tendency to blame local staff, infrastructure and politics for operational failures: “the politics of blame”. Lastly, “the betrayal of the international community” refers to the moral wound felt by forcibly displaced people who denounce the fictitious intervention of the international community and its inability or unwillingness to eradicate injustice and the very causes of crisis.

The humanitarian approaches to thinking about and assisting the needy that I discuss in my chapter relate to disparate sides of the world and, therefore, it questions geographies of birth and national passports as a priori sole identifiers of power. The global humanitarian way of being that I explore in Lebanon’s humanitarian crises is also about the social class and economic status of aid workers, and their own freedom to move inside (and away from) vulnerable areas and opt for educational and professional migration.

From this perspective, I strive towards a geography-free interpretation of Southism. While passports and nationalities still prove their efficaciousness in times of risk, my research in Lebanon has rather aimed to identify comfort zones which protect social statuses, ease and privilege across passports. The hegemonic culture which underpins the “NGOization” of postcolonial settings, on the one hand, can sometimes be adopted regardless of the geographic context of its primary actors. On the other hand, an exploration of hegemonic culture can unearth the organisational and individual ethics of international and local practitioners in approaching southern settings affected by crisis.

This geography-free approach helps to highlight and critically examine the “too-easy West-and-the-rest polarizations sometimes rampant in colonial and postcolonial discourse studies”. To understand the contextuality of humanitarian action and its impact on societies, we therefore need a flexible geography of Southism, which disappears when irrelevant and re-emerges when able to uncover the ad hoc performative roles of nationality.

Nonetheless, in my chapter I limit myself to showing some of the moral and material implications of Southism. After all, the feelings, intentions and aspirations which often underlie the humanitarian career make such Southism not a matter which can be straightforwardly addressed in the short term. Humanitarian actors’ tendency to believe that, whenever a new emergency breaks out, Lebanon – like other “fragile states” – would collapse without international humanitarian help is a belief that requires longstanding cultural intervention.

As I affirm in my chapter, “Southism does not merely make the Global South, or Southern elements in the North, its special place – as Edward Said does with the Orient – but it is, rather, employed by Northern and Southern actors to reassert, solidify and legitimise the Northern humanitarian presence and actions”. As long as the very aim remains the politico-pragmatic role and the moral survival of the Global North, “polycentric forms of knowledge, politics and practice” – as stated by Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley in the introduction– are unlikely to emerge and produce tangible transformations. My contribution, in line with the other 30 chapters of the Handbook, has attempted to prompt critical framings of everyday political geographies that form our material lives, actions, and conceptual referents.

This extract from Dr Carpi’s chapter in The Handbook of South-South Relations, edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Patricia Daley, has been slightly edited for the purposes of this blog post. For more information about the Handbook, see here, and for other pieces published as part of the Southern Responses blog series on Thinking through the Global South, click here.

 For further readings on the themes addressed in this post please read:

Thinking through ‘the global South’ and ‘Southern-responses to displacement’: An introduction – in this introductory piece to our new blog series, Prof. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh sets out a series of questions that our project is exploring with reference to how to think about, and through ‘the South.’

Conceptualising the South and South-South Encounters – in this extract from their introduction to the new book, Handbook of South-South Relations, Prof. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Prof. Patricia Daley explore different ways of conceptualising and studying ‘the global South’ and diverse encounters that take place across and between diversely positioned people and institutions around the world.

Histories and spaces of Southern-led responses to displacement – In this blog post Prof. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh highlights the need for the analyses of local responses to be more attentive to the longstanding history of diverse “local/Southern” actors and examines the ways in which Southern-led responses can work alongside, or explicitly challenge, Northern-led responses to displacement.

Empires of Inclusion – In this post Dr Estella Carpi explores the implications of the concept and process of ‘inclusion’ in relation to South-South Cooperation.

The Localisation of Aid and Southern-led Responses to Displacement: Beyond instrumentalising local actors – In this blog Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh examines a number of questions relating to recent action by international humanitarian actors responding to displacement and the new impetus to localise aid by engaging with ‘local’ actors in and from the global South.

Does Faith-Based Aid Provision always Localise Aid? – In this blog post Dr Estella Carpi argues that there is a need to reflect on local contexts to ensure engagement with local faith communities do not rely on essentialising practices that assume certain groups speak on behalf of a homogenous ‘locale.’

Featured image:  Al-Hikma Modern Hospital, Zarqa.  © E. Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (2018)

 

Advertisements
Categories: Lebanon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Book Review of Lucy Mayblin’s Asylum after Empire (December 2018)

You can access here my review of Lucy Mayblin’s book “Asylum after Empire. Colonial Legacies in the Politics of Asylum Seeking” on Refuge 34(2): 158-160.

https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge/issue/view/2319?fbclid=IwAR13If-SvFwmLSFKTKKL1MRFjB0BSFS6t591zjAGs3qRwjVrdRFkT39HySM

Categories: Book Reviews, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Specchi Scomodi. Etnografia delle Migrazioni Forzate nel Libano Contemporaneo (by Estella Carpi, November 2018)

cover

E’ uscito il mio primo libro Specchi Scomodi il 13 novembre 2018!

Ho pensato a questo libro con un fine divulgativo, seppur si basi sul mio lavoro di dottorato (2010-2015).

Attraverso il racconto etnografico di quattro donne reduci da esperienze diverse di migrazione forzata – Souhà, Iman, ‘Alia e Amal –  cerco di offrire un’approfondita lettura storica e sociologica dei flussi dei profughi verso il Libano contemporaneo e all’interno del paese stesso. Il fine è quello di offrire ai lettori le motivazioni e le implicazioni sociali e politiche dei fenomeni migratori dal Libano meridionale alla periferia di Beirut a causa dell’occupazione israeliana, e dalla Palestina, Iraq e Siria al Libano a causa di processi politici tuttora irrisolti. Con una particolare attenzione al fornimento dei servizi sociali, il libro enfatizza la continuità storica – per l’appunto, gli specchi scomodi – che lega indissolubilmente non solo questi quattro complessi processi storici, ma anche le vite individuali, le sensazioni, le tattiche quotidiane di sopravvivenza economica ed emotiva e le micro-politiche delle quattro donne protagoniste.

Lo potete prenotare online e in libreria. Nelle librerie italiane lo troverete invece in ampia distribuzione da gennaio 2019 in poi.

Buona lettura!

Categories: Libano, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Intermediaries in humanitarian action: a questionable shortcut to the effective localisation of aid? (by Estella Carpi, November 2018)

http://publicanthropologist.cmi.no/2018/11/24/intermediaries-in-humanitarian-action/?fbclid=IwAR2wU9zKjpdhtoUNuFoTST_MEJzuLP_Tc1Z203AYD28kRzBzMgICS-uNgZY

Over the last decade, international humanitarian agencies have endeavoured to develop effective ways to localise their practices of intervention in areas receiving forced migrants or stricken by conflict or disasters. ‘Localisation’ is an umbrella term referring to all approaches to working with local actors, and includes ‘locally-led’ projects which refers specifically to “work that originates with local actors or is designed to support locally emerging initiatives” (Wall 2016).

Local-international partnerships have received much rhetorical attention as a more acceptable face of the humanitarian programming designed in the global North. Nonetheless, there is evidence that northern funding and organisational structures still give preference to implementers from the global north (Ramalingman, Gray and Cerruti 2012). In this framework, the middle space, spanning from international donors to local implementers, is of crucial importance in shaping decision-making processes related to humanitarian funding, practices and policies. In this framework, I would like to advance my considerations on the international humanitarian system that presently places special emphasis on the role of intermediaries in crisis-stricken settings, or contexts that are proxies to crisis.

On November 14 2018 I participated in a roundtable organised by the Overseas Development Institute which aimed to evaluate the role of intermediaries in humanitarianism. In this context, several London-based humanitarian professionals expressed the need to define the role of the intermediary figure in humanitarian action, and to rely on the latter’s support to access local and refugee communities in the targeted areas. By contrast, academic literature which seeks to map such a ‘middle space’ is scant (Kraft and Smith 2018). Based on these observations, what are humanitarian actors trying to bypass, remove, enhance or achieve by emphasising the importance of intermediaries in their sector? With the following considerations, I intend to shed light on how intermediaries may be problematically employed as a shortcut to localisation and as a logistic facilitation strategy to not further contextualise policies and practices which are often designed in the so-called global North.

The first observation I would like to make is related to the layered social identity of intermediaries. Indeed, it is a common belief that intermediaries are mostly local or regional residents with strong connections and networks in the areas targeted by humanitarian programmes. If the line of separation between the ‘international’ and the ‘local’ is unavoidably blurred, it is important to note that some segments of local middle classes – generally those employed in the humanitarian system to manage crisis – are as unfamiliar with other social strata of their own country as many international workers with whom they share common lifestyle standards. As a result, from a relational and emotional perspective, some local professionals may not necessarily be any closer to the people they address. At the same time, however, intermediaries are believed to be well placed to manage local politics, such as corruption, inefficiency or reluctance to comply with external norms and requests. Can such a social figure ever exist? In this respect, the research I conducted from 2011 to late 2013 in Lebanon (Carpi 2015) demonstrates a promiscuous intentionality of the international humanitarian apparatus: on the one hand, the desire to avoid local politics and its discontents, but, on the other, the need to rely on intermediary figures who are able to prepare beneficiary lists and can provide contextual knowledge to enable humanitarian actors to rapidly and safely access local and refugee groups. However, as my research has shown, by doing so international humanitarian agencies often end up recognising local authorities as key actors of the humanitarian machine. In my field experience, the moral impact of what I may call an ‘unintended alliance’ between humanitarian internationals and local gatekeepers was particularly relevant when local residents and refugees expressed their desire to get rid of intermediary figures operating between them, the humanitarian system and the central government. Intermediary roles were predominantly covered by local state officials and delegates (makhatir and mandubin respectively) and other local informal leaders (zu‘ama’). In sum, the necessary entrance of formal and informal local authorities into the international humanitarian labour chain produced a substantial impact on humanitarian workers who must deal with local politics and its contextual configuration.

The second issue that I would like to analyse is the excess of intermediaries in the contemporary humanitarian sphere. Looking at the intermediary role as a relational and performative process rather than a clear-cut sociological mission, it is possible to identify unorthodox configurations of “intermediariness”. Even though it is mainly conceived as local actors, –networks, individuals, diaspora groups or formal organisations that occupy the middle space between initial donors and final implementers, intermediaries can sometimes be epitomised by INGOs and UN agencies. For instance, the humanitarian corridors that currently take Syrian refugees from Lebanon to Italy and France across the Mediterranean are a suitable case in point. As a local aid worker recounted in an interview in Beirut in March 2017, in order to retrieve personal data and carry out an initial selection of the refugee groups who better suit the Italian and the French labour markets, the INGOs in charge of organising the humanitarian corridors rely, in turn, on other INGOs and UN agencies that can provide them with a contact database. This modality of selection is believed to avoid a costly and time-consuming door-to-door strategy. In this case, needs assessment is viewed as a bureaucratic hurdle rather than an effective way of identifying needs and protection and their changing nature. Likewise, another aid practitioner working for an INGO in a village of northern Lebanon affirmed that individual and family eligibility to cash transfers was determined through the UNHCR central database, rather than independent field visits and assessments (interview in Halba, February 2017). These two anecdotes show how intermediaries operating in the humanitarian middle space are at times excessive.

My third observation concerns bureaucracy. Enhancing and institutionalising the role of intermediaries may sort out the difficulty of pinning down sociological figures in changing contexts and of managing institutional trust versus informal society. By this token, we may think that the role of intermediaries should therefore be professionalised. However, the institutionalisation of the intermediary role might instead add complexity and slow down the already hyper-bureaucratised system of international humanitarianism and development. The same system has long been accused of being poorly responsive to context-sensitive needs (Belloni 2005) and de-humanising war and disaster victims (Pandolfi 2002). In this regard, Lebanon offers the meaningful example of the Municipal Support Assistant (MSA). This professional figure, appointed by local municipalities, has been created to work with local authorities and international humanitarian actors and acts as a local government administrative assistant. In the case of Lebanon, the MSA needs to be fluent in Arabic and English to be able to develop double communication strategies. As a municipality representative of Sahel az-Zahrani reported in a 2016 study conducted by UN-Habitat and the American University of Beirut, the MSA has presumably been created to enhance coordination between the local and the humanitarian systems of governance (Boustani, Carpi, Hayat and Moura 2016). However, considering the formal ways of working that the MSA needs to comply with, bureaucratic impediments are practically enhanced. In other words, if bureaucracy is enhanced to achieve greater coordination, I would be wary to believe that actual coordination can soon see the light.

The very aims of the ongoing efforts towards an “intermediary-sation” of humanitarian action need to be clearly motivated and contextualised. From a personal perspective, considering the provisional presence of many international humanitarians and researchers in the areas where crisis management is needed, we continue missing historical continuity. Short field visits are in fact unlikely to trace the local history of human relations, contextual power dynamics and assistance mechanisms. Should the international humanitarian system not find the radical determination to develop physical and moral proximity towards the populations it endeavours to serve, I hence envision intermediaries only as everyday researchers who conduct “reality checks” whenever accurate humanitarian assessments of outreach, programming, policies and local specificities are needed.

References

Belloni, Roberto (2005) Is Humanitarianism Part of the Problem? Nine Theses. John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Boustani, Marwa, Carpi, Estella, Hayat Gebara, and Mourad Yara (2016) Responding to the Syrian Crisis in Lebanon. Collaboration between Aid Agencies and Local Governance Structures. London: IIED Urban Crisis report.

Carpi, Estella (2015) Adhocratic Humanitarianisms and Ageing Emergencies in Lebanon. From the July 2006 War in Beirut’s Southern Suburbs to the Syrian Refugee Influx in the Akkar Villages. PhD dissertation, University of Sydney (Australia).

Kraft, Kathryn and Smith, Jonathan D. (2018) “Between International Donors and Local Faith Communities: Intermediaries in Humanitarian Assistance to Syrian Refugees in Jordan and Lebanon”, Disasters.

Pandolfi, Mariella (2002) “’Moral Entrepreneurs’, Souverenaités Mouvantes et Barbelés: le Bio-Politique dans le Balkans Postcommunistes”, in Politiques Jeux d’Espaces, ed. Pandolfi, M. and Abélès, M., special issue, Anthropologie et Sociétés, Vol. 26, No. 1, pp. 29-50.

Ramalingam, Ben, Gray, Bill, and Cerruti, Giorgia (2012) Missed Opportunities: The Case for Strengthening National and Local Partnership-Based Humanitarian Responses, Christian Aid, CAFOD, Oxfam, Tearfund, and Action Aid.

Wall, Imogen with Hedlund, Kerren (2016) Localisation and Locally-Led Crisis Response: A Literature Review, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation.

Categories: Lebanon, Middle East, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Redefinindo a vulnerabilidade em uma favela de Beirute: quando a cidadania desempodera (Agosto 2018)

Redefining vulnerability in a Beirut suburb: when citizenship disempowers

Biografia: Estella Carpi è doutora em Antropologia Social e Pesquisadora na University College London. Desde 2010, ela vem realizando pesquisas sobre a resposta social à assistência humanitária fornecida no Líbano desde a guerra de 2006 contra Israel até afluxo de refugiados vindos da Síria. Após estudar Árabe em Milão e Damasco (2002-2008), Carpi recebeu seu mestrado pela Universidade de Milão. Sua tese focou em antropologia linguística no Líbano (2008). Ela trabalhou como consultora de pesquisa para o Centro de Pesquisa de Desenvolvimento Internacional (2009-2010), com sede no Cairo, focando em sistemas de proteção social para categorias vulneráveis no Egito, Líbano, Iêmem, Marrocos e Argélia. Também trabalhou para a o Programa de Desenvolvimento das Nações Unidas no Egito (UNDP-Egypt) no Programa de Comércio e Desenvolvimento Árabe (2008), UN-Habitat no Líbano (2016), Trends Research and Advisory e a New York University em Abu Dhabi (2015 e 2016).

Palavras-chave: pobreza urbana – Líbano – política da identidade

Keywords: urban poverty – Lebanon –identity politics

Resumo

Refugiados no Líbano sempre ocuparam o nível mais baixo da pirâmide social libanesa, na maioria das vezes não têm acesso a serviços públicos e não são nem mesmo legalmente reconhecidos como refugiados. Por sua perspectiva, a cidadania, mesmo produzida dentro de um sistema estatal instável e corrupto, parece ser a única ferramenta para garantir serviços básicos. O presente artigo mostra como em alguns casos como o de Hay al-Gharbe, subúrbio de Beirute—habitado por refugiados, trabalhadores migrantes, e um pequeno número de libaneses desfavorecidos—a cidadania, mais do que a condição de refugiado, é o status legal que impede que os vulneráveis tenham acesso ao regime de assistência no Líbano. Neste âmbito, enquanto a pobreza de refugiados e trabalhadores migrantes se tornou o único fator interpretativo externo para explorar a vulnerabilidade no Líbano, um tipo de pobreza urbana, que não está nem conectada à violência política das guerras regionais nem ao regime falho de refugiados, será investigada por meio de métodos etnográficos.

Abstract

Refugees in Lebanon have always occupied the lowest level of the Lebanese social pyramid, often denied access to public services, and not even being legally recognized as refugees. From the refugee perspective, citizenship, however produced within a wavering and corrupted state system, seems to be the only tool guaranteeing basic services.

The present paper shows how, in particular cases like the Beirut suburb of Hay al-Gharbe—inhabited by refugees, migrant workers, and a small number of disadvantaged Lebanese—citizenship rather than refugeehood is the legal status preventing the vulnerable from accessing any assistance regime in Lebanon. In this framework, while refugee and migrant workers’ poverties have by now become the predominant external interpretative lens to explore vulnerability in Lebanon, a kind of urban poverty, which is neither connected to the political violence of regional wars nor to the flawed refugee regime, will be investigated through ethnographic methods.

Introdução

Os subúrbios do sul de Beirute, considerados par excellence a “periferia” do Líbano, ganharam o nome de “Dahiye” em 1982 após serem chamados de “cinturão da miséria”—hizam al bu’s— ao lado do sul de Metn. A região de Dahiye está localizada entre a área agroindustrial do distrito de Choueifat e o município de Hadath (Harb, 2006). Atualmente, os subúrbios ao sul da capital libanesa são, em sua maioria, administrados pelo principal partido xiita Hezbollah, que prevaleceu sob o partido xiita Harakat Amal na década de 1990.

A homogeneização de um Dahiye desolado e miserável tem muitas vezes ofuscado as diferentes causas da pobreza crônica local e das emergentes formas de exclusão, não somente desencadeadas por fluxos migratórios, crises de refugiados, ou estruturas econômicas abstradas, mas por questões políticas que ainda hoje são ignoradas tanto no nível nacional quanto no internacional. A reconstrução do Dahiye de Beirute em 2006 foi monopolizada pelo projeto Waad, desenvolvido pela ONG Jihad al-Binaa, financiada pelo Irã, e o mais bem sucedido projeto de reconstrução das áreas diretamente afetadas pela guerra de julho de 2006, que são indistintamente vistas como marcadas politicamente pelo governança do Hezbollah. Os esforços para a reconstrução não consideraram as áreas do Dahiye que sofrem de vulnerabilidade perene (Dercon, 2006) e que no geral constituem espaços politicamente “anônimos” ou não afiliados.

Estes bairros do Dahiye, como o assentamento ilegal Hay al-Gharbe — objeto de análise da minha pesquisa de campo entre 2011 e 2013 — na verdade não foi alvo de ataques militares e, portanto, nunca foi declarado em “estado de emergência”.

Eu irei, portanto, ilustrar como o meio social do Hay al-Gharbe é discutido por seus habitantes, que são afetados pela vulnerabilidade não relacionada à guerra. Este artigo também mostra como a falta de bem-estar local afeta indivíduos em áreas negligenciadas tanto por agentes estatais quanto não estatais quando a política de emergência governa os espaços sociais. Neste contexto, o comportamento humano não está moldado pelo caráter estrutural da pobreza urbana, mas pelas percepções culturais do sujeito (Benedict, 1934), que também implica em diferentes imaginários e equemas sociais de pobreza dentro do cenário libanês (Lewis, 1959: 3). A gama de normas e valores que fundamentam tais esquemas emergem da adaptabilidade humana à experiência da pobreza. O estudo de Hay al-Gharbe contrasta com a única possibilidade de prática da cidadania na área de Dahiye, que consiste em afiliação política, conformidade local e não contestação das éticas sociais dominantes.

Este artigo, portanto, aponta para as formas em que a cidadania é mediada por experiências vivas e por direitos formais, a fim de ilustrar as formas articuladas e complexas de pertencer a políticas ignoradas (Isin, 2008).

Métodos de Pesquisa

No âmbito da minha pesquisa de doutorado, realizei aproximadamente 90 entrevistas em profundidade entre setembro de 2011 e novembro de 2013 com moradores do Dahiye, beneficiários ou não da ajuda humanitária fornecida  durante e após a guerra entre Líbano e Israel em julho de 2006 — harb tammuz —, que causou um nível sem precedentes de destruição na infraestrutura do Líbano. Também conduzi 68 entrevistas semi-estruturada em diferentes subúrbios de Beirute com organizações não governamentais locais e internacionais, agências da ONU, e municípios locais que forneceram ajuda humanitária aos desabrigados em 2006.

Andei informalmente pela área de Hay al-Gharbe por vários meses após iniciar minha pesquisa de campo de doutorado. Apesar de fazer parte da área do Dahiye, a maioria de meus amigos libaneses e interlocutores nunca tinham ouvido falar desta favela localizada a oeste de Shatila. Desde então, Hay al-Gharbe tornou-se o papel decisivo de minha pesquisa sobre programas humanitários nas áreas de guerra da Grande Beirute.

Em relação à interpretação de dados e análise dos resultados, privilegiei uma abordagem etnográfica qualitativa a fim de sentir as respostas fornecidas por meus interlocutores ao invés de somente coletar e divulgar suas palavras. Portanto, a observação participativa cotidiana — uma ferramenta clássica de pesquisa em antropologia — permitiu uma compreensão mais aprofundada das situações diárias mencionadas no presente artigo e é aqui considerada como principal fonte epistemológica.

Como ficará evidente, uma análise qualitativa mais ampla de como espaços sociais se transformam em cenários humanitários permitiu que eu explorasse as zonas cinzentas da vulnerabilidade, encontradas entre a condição de refugiado e a cidadania, e portando revelasse as desigualdades pouco estudadas do Dahiye.

Hay al-Gharbe: Não Afiliação Política e Marginalização Crônica

Hay al-Gharbe é um assentamento ilegal que fica na fronteira entre o campo palestino de Shatila e o antigo campo de Sabra — agora simplesmente chamado de tajammu‘, “assentamento” — sob o município de al-Ghobeiry, cuja administração pertence ao principal partido xiita libanês Hezbollah. Sabra e Shatila ficaram famosos por causa dos massacres praticados pela aliança Falangista-Israelense em setembro de 1982 durante a Guerra Civil Libanesa (1975-1990).

As fronteiras deste assentamento não são meramente físicas; elas estão conectadas às identidades comunitárias. Na realidade, sua configuração mudou durante a Guerra Civil Libanesa por conta da migração dos habitantes ao atual estádio, Camille Chamoun (al-medina ar-riadiyya), como resultado dos frenquentes bombardeios aos campos palestinos na época e à briga entre diferentes facções políticas.

Para reformar o estádio em 1992, os ocupantes, antigos habitantes de Hay al-Gharbe, foram despejados e retornaram ao assentamento. O assentamento sempre se diferenciou do campo de Shatila por sua composição urbana variada. Além disso, os próprios moradores muitas vezes expressavam rejeição ao serem associados ao campo de refugiados palestinos, pois este último era frequentemente alvo de ataques de diversas forças políticas e, portanto, atraía a atenção da política internacional.

Em particular, os residentes libaneses que temiam um conflito de longa duração em 2006 ou um aumento da violência nos confrontos Xiita-Sunita em 2008 se mudaram da área, mas retornaram mais tarde, incapazes de se estabelecerem em outros lugares da capital libanesa (Das e Davidson, 2011).

A maioria dos moradores de Hay al-Gharbe são Dom (72%), descendentes de nômades que povoaram as terras da Índia entre os séculos três e dez e que agora habitam o Oriente Médio. O assentamento também é habitado por palestinos que não encontraram acomodação nos campos de refugiados; refugiados regionais e trabalhadores que migraram da Asia e África (especialmente iraquianos, cingaleses e sírios) também representam um número considerável dos residentes de Hay al-Gharbe e formam uma esfera marginalizada dentro da realidade multifacetada do Dahiye. Logo, cidadãos libaneses representam apenas uma pequena porção da população suburbana.

Deve ser levado em consideração que a região do Dahiye, onde Hay al-Gharbe está localizado, pode acomodar até 80 mil pessoas. No entanto, em 1995 já abrigava 500 mil residentes (Harb, 2006).  Os grupos sociais que moram em Hay al-Gharbe — 10 mil pessoas no total — tendem a se isolar e evitar interação uns com os outros e com os demais residentes do Dahiye.[1] Além disso, a maioria dos habitantes são mulheres e crianças, uma vez que cerca de 20% dos homens estão presos. O aumento nas taxas de criminalidade pode ser atribuido à pobreza prolongada e ao aumento da violência urbana (Das e Davidson, 2011).

Por conta de procedências nacionais e hábitos culturais diferentes e ao vertiginoso ritmo de urbanização, a demografia citada nunca foi assimilada à malha urbana do Dahiye, impedindo a formação de uma comunidade urbana totalmente integrada. A falta de integração como resultado de um aumento da urbanização é um fenômeno sociológico generalizável no Líbano (Khalaf, 2006).

Em geral, o rápido processo de urbanização pelo qual imigrantes rurais passaram abriu caminho para a formação de assentamentos ilegais, cujo desmantelamento permanece sendo difícil em um país onde as instituições são muito relaxadas e corruptas para impor regras.  O governo libanês, pelo seu lado, não tem interesse em investir no desenvolvimento de infraestrutura de áreas que proliferaram ilegalmente.

Como prova de tal sentimento de isolamento social, Fatma,[2] 14 anos, me mostrou seus sapatos desemparelhados e disse:

“Eu nunca saio de casa, acho humilhante… olhe para meus sapatos, eles são diferentes um do outro e não tenho dinheiro para comprar outros. Não tenho amigos; se você sai com eles, a conversa é sobre o que eles tem. E não tenho nada para contar… Tudo bem, eu me acostumei com isso. Se eu não tivesse me acostumado, eu iria sofrer.”[3]

Najwan é uma mulher palestina que possui cidadania libanesa por conta de seu casamento com um libanês.[4] Ela me contou que sempre morou em Hay al-Gharbe porque sua família não tinha nenhum contato político e, portanto, não teve a oportunidade de estudar ou encontrar um emprego.[5]

“Eu gostaria de colocar minhas crianças na escolha, mas é um maldito círculo vicioso: com que dinheiro ou poderia fazer isso? Elas morrerão da mesma forma que eu: sem ninguém para tomar conta delas.”

Vale ressaltar que a única ajuda acessível à família da Najwan é aquela a que palestinos têm direito. Isso permitiu que Mohammed, um dos meus interlocutores libaneses, se identificasse com os palestinos refugiados, uma vez que sentiu-se traído pelos libaneses após ser demitido do mercado de vegetais de Sabra onde costumava trabalhar há seis meses:

“Os sírios roubaram meu emprego e meu chefe libanês simplesmente quis contratar alguém mais explorável do que eu. Eu transferi minha cidadania libanesa para toda minha família, mas isso não mudou muito para nós. Nós não “recebemos” nenhum míssil israelense em casa. E com a administração do Hezbollah é assim que funciona: se não houver nenhum dano físico causado por Israel, você não receberá ajuda. Você precisa saber que novas famílias que possuem cidadania em Hay al-Gharbe prometeram lealdade à partidos políticos locais, votando neles nas eleições. Os candidatos prometem fornecer geradores mais acessíveis, administrar melhor os lixões e dar água de qualidade. O que nós faríamos por água de qualidade! Para não pagar para beber água, alguns residentes literalmente se escravizam aos partidos… Você viu o hijab da minha filha? Ela não o usa porque realmente quer ou porque queremos isso… ela o usa porque começou a perder cabelo devido a água salgada do chuveiro!”

Najwan e sua família — meio palestina, meio libanesa — não incorporou a precariedade resultante das emergências de guerra, mas sim a vulnerabilidade decorrente da assistência humanitária de longo prazo dada a palestinos. Ao mesmo tempo, a família de Najwan está associada à pobreza crônica causada e agravada pelos deslocamentos esporádicos durante a guerra civil e por políticas de governo (e de ONGs) discriminatórias.

Wafiq,[6] um libanês de 40 anos que mora em Hay al-Gharbe, disse ser grato por ter tido uma mãe palestina, já que isso assegurrou a sua família acesso às remessas enviadas às comunidades migrantes palestinas:

“Graças ao Beit Atfal as-Sumud (‘Casa [Palestina] de Apoio à Criança’), nós recebemos sustento, o que, no entanto, é suficiente apenas para sobreviver. O povo libanês, como meu pai, nunca teve wasta (contatos pessoais válidos) então nunca tivemos acesso aos serviços públicos, que são muito caros para nós…Você acredita em mim? Para que serve então a nacionalidade libanesa! Aqui não temos água para beber, nem eletricidade; existe apenas uma escola e um posto de saúde no distrito graças à algumas associações. No entanto, o exército nacional não nos protege, nem a polícia e nem o Estado… ninguém liga.”

Da mesma forma, Fathi,[7] um libanês de idade mais avançada que costumava levar uma vida reclusa em Hay al-Gharbe por causa de sua pobreza extrema afirma:

“Eu lutei ao lado do Fatah ad-Dahiye na “guerra dos campos” em 1987. Naquela época, eles faziam muitas promessas: ‘Se você lutar, receberá tudo o que você e sua família precisar’. Não vi nenhuma melhora, nenhuma ajuda. Estou cansado de ver mentiras, assim como revoluções e resistências. Minha vida é tão ruim hoje como nos anos da Guerra Civil.”

Amira,[8] uma adolescente de 13 anos disse que após 2008 ela voltou a viver em Hay al-Gharbe com seus pais, mas

“Nada pertence a nós aqui. A terra pertence ao município e eles podem expulsar-nos daqui quando quiserem. Por isso vivemos trancados em casa. A não ser que mostremos a cara, a maioria de nós permanece invisível e esquecido. E quanto mais esquecidos somos, melhor. Não há segurança. Já esqueci o que há lá fora e eu resisto graças a isso.”

A invisibilidade do Hay al-Gharbe, mesmo dentro dos limites do Dahiye, é devido à negligência de longa data do Estado e da falta de interesse das organizações humanitárias internacionais, que tendem a intervir em áreas que estão menos envolvidas na política global.

De fato, estruturas não governamentais — que desempenharam um papel intervencionista importante no Dahiye durante a guerra de julho de 2006 — negligenciaram áreas de vulnerabilidade severa crônica e pobreza urbana, mas não derivadas da guerra e da violência (Karam, 2006).

Após a vitória pírrica do Hezbollah na guerra de julho de 2006, o partido alcançou o auge de sua popularidade ao distribuir recursos sem discriminação sectária; os distritos mais bombardeados do Dahiye, portanto, atingiram níveis sem precedentes de desenvolvimento econômico e de gentrificação (i.e. Haret Hreik e Bi’r Hassan). Na verdade, a nova classe emergente de engenheiros e arquitetos locais foi em sua maioria empregada no processo de reconstrução.

Contudo, como os relatos da vida cotidiana dos moradores têm mostrado até agora, a recostrução pós-guerra criou novas desigualdades locais. É notável que, pelos olhos dos residentes locais, afiliação política e uma rede de contatos de wasta parecem ser um dos únicos fatores necessários para se beneficiar de qualquer regime de assistência, mesmo para cidadãos libaneses.

Atos de assistência e apoio são designados a servir o cidadão médio do Dahiye, representando o primeiro estágio de um contrato social entre o cidadão e o município e suas organizações locais afiliadas, mais do que entre o cidadão e o Estado central. No entanto, este “contrato social local”, inexistente em um nível nacional, é rejeitado por aqueles cidadãos do Dahiye que permanecem relutantes perante um projeto municipal hegemônico: o único capaz de fornecer um esquema de cidadania tangível nos subúrbios do sul.

Dentro da estrutura de um sistema político sectário e de desigualdades sociais baseadas em etnia, a crescente diversidade étnica do Hay al-Gharbe não facilita a afiliação de moradores heterogêneos de facções políticas específicas, o que seria capaz de, por sua vez, chamar a atenção internacionalmente e fornecer serviços básicos para o bairro.

Hay al-Gharbe, portanto, se apresenta como o “espectro da política” (Das e Davidson, 2011), denunciando os aspectos negligentes do Estado central assim como do governo engenhoso do Hezbollah no município de al-Ghobeiry. A vida reclusa destas pessoas, cujos rostos vestem o véu da miséria em al-Ghobeiry, permite que o governo local e sua negligência saiam impunes. A guerra de 2006 e a subsequente reconstrução deveria ter re-estratificado a sociedade libanesa, a recente falta de emergências diretas na favela — que normalmente geram uma série de projetos de longa duração e de locais seguros — desfavoreceu seus habitantes ainda mais, uma vez que eles não foram afetados diretamente pelos ataques de Israel e não se beneficiaram dos projetos de reconstrução.

O estudo de Hay al-Gharbe revela que a pobreza identificada no Dahiye é moldada por políticas de identidade e não somente por questões sócio-econômicas. O fato de que o humanitarismo internacional tende a não interferir em lugares onde não há interesses políticos é empiricamente confirmado pela existência — e situação crônica — deste assentamento ilegal.

A maioria da indústria humanitária ignorou a favela tanto quanto o Estado libanês. Na verdade, a principal razão para as intervenções de guerra é a declaração oficial de estado de “emergência”, mas deveria ser traçada pelo indicador político a que o território está atribuído. Este é o motivo pela qual a guerra eclode em lugares específicos do Líbano ou de outros países. Neste sentido, tanto agentes estatais quanto não estatais são vistos por terem negligenciado um local que não é considerado “humanizável”, uma vez que fica fora de sua agenda política.

Deve ser notado que o Líbano não é um signatário da Convenção para Refugiados de 1951 e é, portanto, classificado como um país de trânsito. Com relação a isso, refugiados palestinos, iraquianos e sudaneses, mesmo que eles não consigam obter um status legítimo que assegure sua vulnerabilidade como refugiados, ainda são classificados como de fato aptos a receberem ajuda, mesmo que insuficiente e desorganizada.

Em contrapartida, os libaneses desfavorecidos que encontrei em Hay al-Gharbe, e cujas vozes reportei aqui, permanecem fora das políticas de inclusão que o Hezbollah cada vez mais parece promover — especialmente após a guerra de julho — e que continuam sendo ignoradas pelas políticas discriminatórias do Estado. A falta de rótulos étnicos, políticos e confessionais úteis e de wasta com governantes resulta em uma vida negligenciada e reclusa. Neste cenário, a vulnerabilidade é configurada como falta de contatos sociais, influência, recursos e, em especial, contato com capital humano externo (Price Wolf, 2007).

As políticas territoriais do projeto de reconstrução do Dahiye foram bem sucedidas no que diz respeito a compensação da guerra — realizadas dentro de um curto período de tempo, e sem qualquer discriminação sectária, confirmaram a continuidade entre a destruição urbana proveniente da guerra e a reconstrução como uma inversão deste processo em espaços hegemônicos. Contudo, dentro da ampla demografia libanesa sectária e étnica, tal continuidade é interrompida sempre que em um distrito urbano há eventualmente ausência de atenção política devido à sua identidade social menos definida.

Além da abdicação do Estado central de suas responsabilidades, as condições extremas que persistem em Hay al-Gharbe são um xeque-mate do pós-guerra no sobrevalorizado projeto Waad de reconstrução do Dahiye. A redistribuição de recursos do projeto Waad tem sido considerada como igualitária e eficiente, devido à estratégias de compensação destinadas a apagar a sensação de destruição da esfera pública e evitar o ressentimento generalizado contra o Hezbollah em relação a repercussão da guerra de 2006.

Cidadania como Estratégia Discursiva: Hay al-Gharbe no âmbito dos Subúrbios do Sul de Beirute

Ao contrário de Hay al-Gharbe, o Dahiye dominante, normalmente denominado ad-Dahiye al-mazbuta (Harb, 2006), é conhecido por pessoas de fora por conta dos bombardeios israelenses que atingiram a área incontáveis vezes na história do Líbano e também porque é considerado pela mídia internacional como o reduto do Hezbollah.

O setor da periferia destruído pelos aviões israelenses tem sido visto como um local de escolha. Considerando que estes distritos gentrificados são os únicos em que municípios do Dahiye e associações afiliadas ao Hezbollah fornecem serviços básicos e entretenimento (Deeb e Harb, 2010), o desejo das pessoas de se tornarem integrantes do Dahiye passou a ser muito mais forte. Por outro lado, Hay al-Gharbe é um lugar onde as pessoas acabam morando por necessidade, mas também porque são indesejadas e desfavorecidas, o que transforma o local em um dos microcosmos de exclusão do cidadão no Líbano.

Hay al-Gharbe não pode ser considerado um “local de escolha”, uma vez que seus habitantes não têm a oportunidade de desafiar a narrativa predominante da classe e da cidadania, o que contribue para a afirmação de certas hierarquias sociais. Isto acontece devido à impossibilidade de “posicionamento público” (Holston, 2009), ou seja, de reivindicar direitos legais, cívicos e sociais na condição de cidadãos no espaço do Dahiye. Os moradores, por não serem donos da terra, não podem nem mesmo pedir qualquer direito de mobilidade, pois a residência urbana é normalmente a base para a mobilização.

De fato, naquelas áreas onde o espaço público atrai humilhação e o medo de se mudar, uma vida reclusa é preferida e a vulnerabilidade permanece sendo o discurso dominante nos áreas clássicas da condição de refugiado e de migração econômica. Neste cenário, a cidadania pode ser concebida como uma mera observadora e gestora das diferenças no Líbano e é implementada por meio da proteção e prestação de serviço, sempre que as relações de poder subjacentes expressam sua assertividade em favor do beneficiário.

A política de identidade em relação ao acesso aos serviços tem sido abordada apenas parcialmente pelos estudiosos. No caso específico do Líbano, embora haja um vasto leque de literatura sobre políticas e alocação de recursos relacionados às comunidades confessionais (Fawaz, 2005; Jawad, 2007; Harb, 2010), a politização do bem-estar (Ben-Nefissa et al., 2005; Cammett, 2014) e o papel da religião nas associações de bem-estar durante e após a guerra civil do Líbano, as áreas cinzentas entre o bem-estar diário e os estados de emergência não foram pesquisados.

Como prova da diminuição da assistência dada aos cidadãos não afiliados politicamente, mesmo dentro do “Dahiye hegemônico”, segue o relato de ‘Abbas, um libanês desempregado já nos seus 50 anos que ficou desabrigado em 2006. Enquanto jantávamos em sua casa em Haret Hreik ele disse:

“As folhas de vinho que você está comendo são do nosso quintal no Sul. Depois da guerra não consegui encontrar nenhum emprego por aqui… Nossos bolsos estão vazios, porque não conhecemos ninguém na política”.[9]

Igualmente, Farah, um jovem padeiro libanês em Bi’r al-‘Abed, estava reclamando do fato de que antes do harb tammuz o Hezbollah costumava conceder empréstimos para pequenas empresas:

“Agora o custo de vida ficou exorbitante. Eles acham que estamos em Dubai? Após a guerra, devido à falta de petróleo, os motoristas [táxi compartilhado] aumentaram a taxa da corrida de LBP 1,500 para LBP 2,000 [libra libanesa]. Nunca mais voltou ao que era antes. A vida se tornou impossível. Não tenho poder de compra.”[10]

Apesar do sentimento pessoal de posse territorial e de pertencimento, Ahmad, 32 anos, e dono de uma loja em al-Ghobeiry, queixou-se sobre a falta de ideias não dominantes: “Se você não se enquandrar na Resistência, vocês está sozinho, por conta própria. Eles tiram de você o que ganhou nos tempos da guerra”.[11]

Da mesma forma, Salwa, uma jovem de Haret Hreik lamentou o fato dos municípios locais abandonarem pessoas carentes, ao contrário dos anos anteriores à guerra de 2006:

“Se você não tem um mártir ou um ferido entre os membros de sua família por causa de uma das guerras do Hezbollah, você está ferrado. Há vários serviços de caridade para categorias especiais, para mostrar que o partido está engajado e coisas assim…”[12]

Nawal, um cabeleireiro de al-Mreije, um distrito de maioria cristã dentro dos subúrbios do Dahiye conta:

“Não precisa ter medo de mim [risos], eu não tenho nada a ver com esses mestres da guerra que mandam na área […]. Eles conhecem sua família melhor do que você! Eles só dão ajuda aos xiitas agora, não é mais como durante o harb tammuz. O resto que vocês escutam por aí é só propaganda. Se você não está engajado com a política deles você se torna ninguém.”[13]

Para discutir a cidadania em Hay al-Gharbe e o papel que o status legal dos cidadãos tem na negação do acesso aos regimes de bem-estar, vale mencionar a eterna retórica anti-Estado presente nos subúrbios do sul de Beirute: uma retórica que, apesar de inflada pelo Hezbollah para ganhar consenso local, é produzida a partir do abandono da área pelo Estado, e mesmo pela hostilidade do mesmo, largamente percebida na região.

Este projeto hegemônico de cidadania territorial é citado e praticado em oposição ao Estado central, mesmo quando as fronteiras entre o Estado central e o partido fluem bem. A respeito disso, vale ressaltar que a retórica anti-governo adotada pelo partido xiita permaneceu a mesma mesmo quando o Parlamento Libanês foi, sobretudo, liderado pela coalização de 8 de março, a qual faz parte o Hezbollah. Mesmo sob o domínio do antigo Primeiro Ministro Libanês do governo de Najib Miqati, considerado politicamente próximo ao Hezbollah, os habitantes de Dahiye enxergavam o governo central como o inimigo, que não protegia seu povo das invasões e destruições de Israel.

Dito isto, uma posição ideológica reificada contra o Estado central serve melhor o modelo de cidadania que o Hezbollah vem construindo no Dahiye ao longo dos anos no nível municipal, que é considerado participativo, principalmente após o término da ocupação israelense no Líbano (2000).  Neste contexto, a noção de cidadania deve ser entendida como um contrato social entre cidadãos locais e municípios do Dahiye, sem considerar uma implicação nacional mais ampla.

Do ponto de vista destas considerações, a linguagem da cidadania ortodoxa sofre para descrever o cenário libanês em termos de direitos e responsabilidades, o que deveria estar fora dos padrões clássicos que constituem o Estado Nacional. Contudo, uma noção pragmática de cidadania ainda pode ser uma ferramenta epistêmica fundamental para identificar novas linhas de inclusão e exclusão.

No Dahiye, o senso cívico, como apresentado pelo sociólogo Robert Putnam (1994), i.e. a aceitação dos direitos e obrigações que qualquer cidadania implica ainda é vista como sectária tanto pelos locais como por estrangeiros, principalmente moradores que não se identificam com o projeto de cidadania hegemônica territorial implementada pelo principal governante local, o Hezbollah.

Alguns dos testemunhos que coletei no Dahiye pareciam ser uma tentativa de desafiar uma cidadania hierárquica que corre ao lado da afiliação política, mas que ainda lutam para se materializar em ações políticas que, por sua vez, levariam a um governo idealmente assertivo e que funcione bem para assim expandir sua esfera de justiça social. Isto é devido ao fato de que a melhoria sócio-econômica de uma parte do Dahiye é relativamente recente e decorrente da instabilidade destes subúrbios e sua permanente exposição aos conflitos locais e regionais.

Como ilustrei por meio do ponto de vista das pessoas, bem-estar social é seletivamente implementado e melhorado com base nas relações políticas que cada indivíduo ou família desenvolveu ao se juntar a redes sociais específicas. Neste contexto, gostaria de ressaltar que a ação política ainda é interpretada como uma expressão de identidade, mais do que uma mera estratégia maquiavélica utilizada para ganhar benefícios. Portanto, o estereótipo em torno da qual a ideia do Dahiye foi construída ao longo das décadas — a área perigosa que abriga xiitas miseráveis sempre “prontos para morrer” — leva a uma interpretação de identidade como um incentivo político em vez de um ato performativo resultante de certas condições sociais e econômicas. Como resultado, categorias abstradas do Dahiye como xiitas e “refugiados palestinos” são arbitrariamente usados como identificadores de individualidades políticas puras.

A política — não somente “islâmica” — da Resistência promovida pelo Hezbollah ainda é um modelo predominante de cidadania territorial, funcionando como um fator de coesão da malha social dominante. A questão da Resistência apareceu em minha discussão uma vez que os participantes da pesquisa expressivamente associaram a melhoria econômica e o acesso aos serviços com o cumprimento de jure do cidadão a um ethos oficial traçado pelos governantes do Dahiye na esfera pública. Como em qualquer sistema de valores e crenças, definidos em termos de ética social, alguns moradores locais não se sentem representados e, portanto, motivados a aderirem aos padrões éticos e políticos fornecidos pelo partido. Nestes casos, a cidadania é de facto interrompida. Esta análise sociológica do Dahiye nos ajuda a entender como a cidadania interrompida de Hay al-Gharbe deveria ser detectada em diferentes políticas negligentes de gerenciamento do espaço e de reassentamento. Políticas que mantém o conforto em viver em sociedade e o conforto da mobilidade na área como reféns ao defender o fornecimento escasso de assistência para alguns enquanto ignorando outros, em conformidade com uma ditadura de distribuição de recursos orientada pela identidade — e atenção dos pesquisadores.

Discussão e conclusão

Neste artigo, a noção de cidadania foi utilizada como uma ferramenta discursiva capaz de descobrir as não estudadas desigualdades do Dahiye, que têm muitas vezes se mostrado invisíveis ou homogeneizadas pelos estereótipos criados ao longo da história do chamado “cinturão da miséria” (Harb, 2006).

De um lado, quando adotamos a perspectiva dos moradores locais, a cidadania é representada como um sentimento de pertencimento e na forma de reivindicação territorial. Por outro, também é concebida por dissidentes da hegemonia local como a adoção de valores éticos que são impostos de cima para baixo. Neste sentido, a cidadania de facto — embora aqui citada como meramente municipal — é mantida por pessoas que estão dispostas a obedecer a ética dominante do Dahiye. Tais cidadãos de facto territoriais contribuem para criar, por assim dizer, uma ditadura de indivíduos privilegiados ou simplesmente emancipados entre os diversamente definidos como vulneráveis, e constituindo, portanto, os únicos cidadãos reais dentro de um Estado ainda relaxado.

Minha crítica a homogeneização do Dahiye — o que certamente não é novidade para pesquisadores locais e internacionais — procura trazer ao primeiro plano como a política de identidade informa a política de bem-estar, e o quão grotesca ad hoc é a intervenção humanitária nos distritos do Dahiye atingidos pela guerra, enquanto a vulnerabilidade crônica não relacionada a guerra é negligenciada.

Esses mesmos grupos vulneráveis ​​são aqueles que Chamber (1986) chamaram “os perdedores escondidos”. Estes ciclicamente se encontram em competição com recém-chegados pobres que tendem a se mudar para essas áreas financeiramente mais acessíveis durante deslocamentos e crises de emergência.

De acordo com a lógica do aparato humanitário impulsionada pela emergência, qualquer pesquisador — também me inclua — tende a abordar os subúrbios do sul como se fossem um mero local para escrever sobre guerra e patografias pós-guerra. Logo, neste contexto de assistência humanitária e desenvolvimento de projetos de longa duração que proliferaram no Dahiye após a guerra de julho de 2006, os espaços heterogêneos de exclusão nos subúrbios, excluídos do recente processo de gentrificação urbana e que abrigam cidadãos cuja falta de vulnerabilidade classificável os nega acesso aos serviços, lutam para se destacarem em um habitat social mais amplo.

Provida de uma visão mais ampla do ambiente dos subúrbios, foi possível ilustrar, em relação a vulnerabilidade do cidadão, a marginalização social de grupos de refugiados, como o povo palestino que citei, crônicamente deixado de fora do modelo hegemônico de cidadania municipal estabelecido pelo Hezbollah, e também discriminado por políticas estatais. Da mesma forma, foi possível ver como mesmo a cidadania normativa não fornece aos necessitados recursos básicos, a favela de Hay al-Gharbe é um exemplo. Portanto, cidadãos não afiliados politicamente, morando em lugares que não aparecem nos mapas oficiais porque são menos marcados politicamente e demograficamente híbridos, se encontram nas mesmas condições extremas que os refugiados (permanentes). Em um ambiente em que a vulnerabilidade não é apenas sobre a exposição à guerra, mas também sobre a política representando estas guerras, e se a condição de refugiado e a vulnerabilidade correm em paralelo por definição, ter o status de cidadão ainda pode levar ao desempoderamento.

Bibliografia

BENEDICT, Ruth. 1934. Patterns of Culture. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishers.

BEN-NEFISSA, Sarah, Nabil ‘ABD-EL-FATTAH, Sari HANAFI, e Carlos MILANI. 2005. NGOs and Governance in the Arab World. Cairo, Egypt: AUC Press.

CAMMETT, Melanie. 2014. Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

CHAMBERS, Robert. 1986. “‘Hidden Losers? The Impact of Rural Refugees and Refugee Programmes on Poorer Hosts”. International Migration Review, 20: 245–263.

DAS, Rupen, e Julie DAVIDSON. 2011. Profiles of Poverty. The Human Face of Poverty in Lebanon. Mansourieh, Lebanon: ed. Niamh Fleming-Farrell.

DEEB, Lara, e Mona HARB. 2010. “Piety and Leisure: Youth Negotiations of Moral Authority and new Leisure Sites in al-Dahiya”. Bahithat: Cultural Practices of Arab Youth, 14: 414-427.

DERCON, Stefan. 2006. “Vulnerability: a Micro-Perspective”. QEH Working Paper Series, 149. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

FAWAZ, Mona. 2005. “Agency and Ideology in Community Services: Islamic NGOs in the Southern Suburbs of Beirut”. In S. Ben-Nefi ssa, N. ‘Abd al-Fattah, S. Hanafi, e C. Milani (eds.) NGOs and Governance in the Arab World. Cairo: AUC Press, 229–256.

HARB, Mona. 2006. “La Dahiye de Beyrouth: parcours d’une stigmatisation urbaine, consolidation d’un territoire politique”. In J. C. Depaule (ed.) Les mots de la stigmatisation urbaine. Paris: UNESCO éditions, 199-224.

HARB, Mona. 2010. Le Hezbollah à Beirut (1985–2005): de la Banlieue à la Ville. Paris: IFPO-Karthala.

HOLSTON, James. 2009. Insurgent Citizenship: Disjunctions of Democracy and Modernity in Brazil. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

ISIN, Engin F. 2008. “Theorizing Acts of Citizenship”. In  E. F. Isin e G. M. Nielsen (eds.) Acts of Citizenship. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 15–43.

JAWAD, Rana. 2007. “Human Ethics and Welfare Particularism: An Exploration of the Social Welfare Regime in Lebanon”. Ethics and Social Welfare 1(2): 123–146.

KARAM, Karam. 2006. Le Mouvement Civil au Liban. Revendications, Protestations et Mobilisations Associatives dans l’Après-Guerre. Paris: Karthala-Iremam.

KHALAF, Samir. 2006. Heart of Beirut: Reclaiming the Bourj. London: Saqi Books.

LEWIS, Oscar. 1959. Five Families: Mexican Case Studies in the Culture of Poverty. New York: Basic Books, Inc.PRICE WOLF, Jennifer. 2007. “Sociological Theories of Poverty in Urban America”. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 16 (1-2): 41-56.

PUTNAM, Robert D., Robert LEONARDI, e Raffaella Y. NANETTI. 1994. Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

[1] ‘Abd-el-Rahim, Hay al-Gharbe, 19 outubro, 2012.

[2] Visita domiciliar em Hay al-Gharbe, 29 janeiro, 2013.

[3] Tradução de árabe para português.

[4] Hay al-Gharbe, 11 fevereiro, 2013.

[5] Decreto Ministerial No. 17561 do 10 Julho 1962.

[6] Hay al-Gharbe, 21 janeiro, 2013.

[7] 15 fevereiro, 2013.

[8] Hay al-Gharbe, 13 fevereiro, 2013.

[9] Haret Hreik, 27 janeiro, 2012.

[10] Bi’r al-‘Abed, 23 janeiro, 2012.

[11] Al-Ghobeiry, 13 outubro, 2011.

[12] Haret Hreik, 15 outubro, 2011.

[13] Al-Mreije, Beirut, 31 outubro, 2012.

Categories: Lebanon, Middle East, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Redefinindo a vulnerabilidade em uma favela de Beirute: cidadania e refúgio às margens da sociedade libanesa (August 2018)

Redefinindo a vulnerabilidade em uma favela de Beirute:

Estella Carpi

 

http://www.revistadiaspora.org/2018/08/13/redefinindo-a-vulnerabilidade-em-uma-favela-de-beirute/

Refugiados no Líbano sempre ocuparam o nível mais baixo da pirâmide social libanesa, na maioria das vezes não têm acesso a serviços públicos e não são nem mesmo legalmente reconhecidos como refugiados. A cidadania, mesmo produzida dentro de um sistema estatal instável e corrupto, parece ser a única ferramenta para garantir serviços básicos. No entanto, em alguns casos como o de Hay al-Gharbe, subúrbio de Beirute — habitado por refugiados, trabalhadores migrantes, e um pequeno número de libaneses desfavorecidos — a cidadania, mais do que a condição de refugiado, é o status legal que impede que os vulneráveis tenham acesso ao regime de assistência no Líbano. Neste âmbito, enquanto a pobreza de refugiados e trabalhadores migrantes se tornou o único fator interpretativo externo para explorar a vulnerabilidade no Líbano, um tipo de pobreza urbana não está nem conectada à violência política das guerras regionais nem ao regime falho de refugiados.

Os subúrbios do sul de Beirute, considerados a “periferia” do Líbano, ganharam o nome de “Dahiye” em 1982 após serem chamados de “cinturão da miséria”—hizam al bu’s. Atualmente, os subúrbios ao sul da capital libanesa são, em sua maioria, administrados pelo principal partido xiita Hezbollah, que prevaleceu sob o partido xiita Harakat Amal na década de 1990. Deve ser notado que o Líbano não é um signatário da Convenção para Refugiados de 1951 e é, portanto, classificado como um país de trânsito. Com relação a isso, refugiados palestinos, iraquianos e sudaneses, mesmo sem obter um status legítimo que assegure sua vulnerabilidade como refugiados, ainda são classificados como aptos a receberem ajuda, mesmo que insuficiente e desorganizada.

No Dahiye, as diferentes causas da pobreza crônica local e das emergentes formas de exclusão não são somente desencadeadas por fluxos migratórios, crises de refugiados, ou estruturas econômicas abstratas, mas por questões políticas que ainda hoje são ignoradas tanto no nível nacional quanto no internacional. A reconstrução do Dahiye de Beirute após a guerra Israel-Líbano de julho de 2006 foi monopolizada pelo projeto Waad, desenvolvido pela ONG Jihad al-Binaa, financiada pelo Irã, e o mais bem sucedido projeto de reconstrução das áreas diretamente afetadas, que são marcadas politicamente pelo governança do Hezbollah. Os esforços para a reconstrução não consideraram as áreas do Dahiye que sofrem de vulnerabilidade perene e que no geral constituem espaços politicamente “anônimos” ou não afiliados.

Estes bairros do Dahiye, como o assentamento ilegal Hay al-Gharbe, na verdade não foram alvo de ataques militares israelenses e, portanto, nunca foram declarado em “estado de emergência”. Eu irei, portanto, ilustrar como os habitantes de Hay al-Gharbe são afetados pela vulnerabilidade não relacionada à guerra. Também vou mostrar como a falta de bem-estar local afeta indivíduos em áreas negligenciadas tanto por agentes estatais quanto não estatais quando a política de emergência governa os espaços sociais.

A maioria dos moradores de Hay al-Gharbe são Dom (72%), descendentes de nômades que povoaram as terras da Índia entre os séculos três e dez e que agora habitam o Oriente Médio. O assentamento também é habitado por palestinos que não encontraram acomodação nos campos de refugiados; refugiados regionais e trabalhadores que migraram da Asia e África (especialmente iraquianos, cingaleses e sírios) também representam um número considerável dos residentes de Hay al-Gharbe e formam uma esfera marginalizada dentro da realidade multifacetada do Dahiye. Logo, cidadãos libaneses representam apenas uma pequena porção da população suburbana.

Por conta de procedências nacionais e hábitos culturais diferentes e ao vertiginoso ritmo de urbanização, a demografia citada nunca foi assimilada à malha urbana do Dahiye, impedindo a formação de uma comunidade urbana totalmente integrada. A falta de integração como resultado de um aumento da urbanização é um fenômeno sociológico generalizável no Líbano. O governo libanês, pelo seu lado, não tem interesse em investir no desenvolvimento de infraestrutura de áreas que proliferaram ilegalmente.

Najwan é uma mulher palestina que possui cidadania libanesa por conta de seu casamento com um libanês. Ela me contou que sempre morou em Hay al-Gharbe porque sua família palestina não tinha nenhum contato político e, portanto, não teve a oportunidade de estudar ou encontrar um emprego (Decreto Ministerial No. 17561 do 10 Julho 1962).

“Eu gostaria de colocar minhas crianças na escolha, mas é um maldito círculo vicioso: com que dinheiro ou poderia fazer isso? Elas morrerão da mesma forma que eu: sem ninguém para tomar conta delas.”

Vale ressaltar que a única ajuda acessível à família da Najwan é aquela a que palestinos têm direito. Isso permitiu que também o seu marido libanês se identificasse com os palestinos refugiados, uma vez que sentiu-se traído pelos libaneses após ser demitido do mercado de vegetais de Sabra onde costumava trabalhar há seis meses. Najwan e sua família — meio palestina, meio libanesa — não incorporou a precariedade resultante das emergências de guerra, mas sim a vulnerabilidade decorrente da assistência humanitária de longo prazo dada a palestinos. Ao mesmo tempo, a família de Najwan está associada à pobreza crônica causada e agravada pelos deslocamentos esporádicos durante a guerra civil e por políticas de governo (e de ONGs) discriminatórias.

Amira, uma adolescente de 13 anos disse que após 2008 ela voltou a viver em Hay al-Gharbe com seus pais, mas

“Nada pertence a nós aqui. A terra pertence ao município e eles podem expulsar-nos daqui quando quiserem. Por isso vivemos trancados em casa. A não ser que mostremos a cara, a maioria de nós permanece invisível e esquecido. E quanto mais esquecidos somos, melhor. Não há segurança. Já esqueci o que há lá fora e eu resisto graças a isso.”

A invisibilidade do Hay al-Gharbe, mesmo dentro dos limites do Dahiye, é devido à negligência de longa data do Estado e da falta de interesse das organizações humanitárias internacionais, que tendem a intervir em áreas que estão menos envolvidas na política global.
Dentro da estrutura de um sistema político sectário e de desigualdades sociais baseadas em etnia, a crescente diversidade étnica do Hay al-Gharbe não facilita a afiliação de moradores heterogêneos de facções políticas específicas, o que seria capaz de, por sua vez, chamar a atenção internacionalmente e fornecer serviços básicos para o bairro.

Hay al-Gharbe, portanto, se apresenta como o “espectro da política”, denunciando os aspectos negligentes do Estado central assim como do governo engenhoso do Hezbollah no município de al-Ghobeiry. A vida reclusa destas pessoas, cujos rostos vestem o véu da miséria em al-Ghobeiry, permite que o governo local e sua negligência saiam impunes. A guerra de 2006 e a subsequente reconstrução deveria ter re-estratificado a sociedade libanesa, a recente falta de emergências diretas na favela — que normalmente geram uma série de projetos de longa duração e de locais seguros — desfavorece seus habitantes ainda mais, uma vez que eles não foram afetados diretamente pelos ataques de Israel e não se beneficiaram dos projetos de reconstrução. Neste sentido, tanto agentes estatais quanto não estatais são vistos por terem negligenciado um local que não é considerado “humanizável”, uma vez que fica fora de sua agenda política.

O meu estudo de Hay al-Gharbe revela que a pobreza identificada no Dahiye é moldada por políticas de identidade e não somente por questões sócio-econômicas. O fato de que o humanitarismo internacional tende a não interferir em lugares onde não há interesses políticos é confirmado pela existência — e situação crônica — deste assentamento ilegal.

A eterna retórica anti-Estado presente nos subúrbios do sul de Beirute é uma retórica que, apesar de inflada pelo Hezbollah para ganhar consenso local, é produzida a partir do abandono da área pelo Estado central, e mesmo pela hostilidade do mesmo, largamente percebida na região. Neste contexto, categorias abstratas do Dahiye como xiitas e “refugiados palestinos” são arbitrariamente usados como identificadores de individualidades políticas puras. Grupos vulneráveis ciclicamente se encontram em competição com recém-chegados pobres que tendem a se mudar para essas áreas financeiramente mais acessíveis durante deslocamentos e crises de emergência.

Portanto, cidadãos não filiados politicamente, morando em lugares que não aparecem nos mapas oficiais porque são menos marcados politicamente e demograficamente híbridos, se encontram nas mesmas condições extremas que os refugiados (permanentes) no Líbano contemporâneo. Em um ambiente em que a vulnerabilidade não é apenas sobre a exposição à guerra, mas também sobre a política que representa estas guerras, ter o status de cidadão ainda pode levar ao desempoderamento.

Para saber mais:

CAMMETT, Melanie. 2014. Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

DAS, Rupen, e Julie DAVIDSON. 2011. Profiles of Poverty. The Human Face of Poverty in Lebanon. Mansourieh, Lebanon: ed. Niamh Fleming-Farrell.

DEEB, Lara, e Mona HARB. 2010. “Piety and Leisure: Youth Negotiations of Moral Authority and new Leisure Sites in al-Dahiya”. Bahithat: Cultural Practices of Arab Youth, 14: 414-427.

FAWAZ, Mona. 2005. “Agency and Ideology in Community Services: Islamic NGOs in the Southern Suburbs of Beirut”. In S. Ben-Nefi ssa, N. ‘Abd al-Fattah, S. Hanafi, e C. Milani (eds.) NGOs and Governance in the Arab World. Cairo: AUC Press, 229–256.

HARB, Mona. 2006. “La Dahiye de Beyrouth: parcours d’une stigmatisation urbaine, consolidation d’un territoire politique”. In J. C. Depaule (ed.) Les mots de la stigmatisation urbaine. Paris: UNESCO éditions, 199-224.

HARB, Mona. 2010. Le Hezbollah à Beirut (1985–2005): de la Banlieue à la Ville. Paris: IFPO-Karthala.

JAWAD, Rana. 2007. “Human Ethics and Welfare Particularism: An Exploration of the Social Welfare Regime in Lebanon”. Ethics and Social Welfare 1(2): 123–146.

Sobre a autora:

Estella Carpi è doutora em Antropologia Social e Pesquisadora na University College London. Desde 2010, ela vem realizando pesquisas sobre a resposta social à assistência humanitária fornecida no Oriente Medio desde a guerra de 2006 contra Israel até afluxo de refugiados vindos da Síria.

Categories: Lebanon, Middle East, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Refugee Hospitality in Lebanon and Turkey. On Making the “Other” (June, 2018)

We’ve been literally inundated with refugee hospitality accounts… Indeed, it’s primarily a discourse, which problematically speaks the language of the nation-state when it’s paraded as a political virtue. As a matter of fact, over the last 7 years it paradoxically ended up acting as a social fragmentation force in the Syria neighbourhood.
Read our latest article, where Lebanon converses with Turkey, co-authored with Dr Pınar Şenoğuz from the University of Gottingen.

Abstract:

This paper examines the hospitality provided to Syrian refugees during the refugee crisis spanning from 2011 to 2016 in the border areas of Gaziantep (southeastern Turkey) and the Akkar region (northern Lebanon). Hospitality, apart from a cultural value and societal response to the protracted refugee influx, is a discursive strategy of socio‐spatial control used by humanitarian agencies, local and national authorities. This paper, first, argues against hospitality as an assessment to ethically compare host countries (i.e. more welcoming versus less welcoming states). Second, drawing on Walters’ notion of “humanitarian border”, it shows how the governmental, humanitarian, and everyday workings of hospitality exercise an assertive politics of sovereignty over the social encounter between locals and refugees. We examine the state‐centered hospitality in the Turkish case and a humanitarian‐promoted hospitality in the Lebanese case. We also show how the hospitality discourse shapes the spaces that refugees, citizens, and earlier migrants partake in.

To access the entire article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/imig.12471#.WxemBx-bkyM.facebook

 

Categories: Lebanon, Middle East, Turkey, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Humanitarianism in an Urban Lebanese Setting: Missed Opportunities (by Estella Carpi and Camillo Boano)

The UNDP and UKAID funded public market. Halba, 23 February 2017. Photo credit: Estella Carpi

 

http://legal-agenda.com/en/article.php?id=4211

Prior to the arrival of Syrian refugees and international humanitarian agencies in 2011, the Akkar region in northern Lebanon bordering Syria has rarely made global headlines. However, this region has historically suffered from local and national instability as a result of war and social upheavals without receiving adequate relief and support.

Basic infrastructure and public services in Akkar’s capital, Halba, are insufficient. Electricity, when not purchased privately, is available for only four hours per day. Local people have access to a small number of hospitals and schools. With the arrival of Syrian refugees fleeing violence, Halba – historically a regional hub for administrative affairs – has become a hub for humanitarian response too. Due to demographic growth, organic expansion and massive stress on infrastructure, an urgent reflection on the transformation of the city is increasingly needed.

This article examines the interface between ‘the urban’ and the humanitarian system in a Syrian-Lebanese border area. It aims to shed light on the antagonistic and, at times, collaborative relationships between local authorities, local and refugee labourers, and international humanitarian agencies. Moreover, in an era when humanitarian agencies expand their urban operations, cities contribute to “redefining the focus and limits (temporal, spatial, operational) of humanitarian action”.[1]

An ‘Urban’ Political Economy?

Home to 128 municipalities and 160 villages, Akkar is one of the country’s most deprived regions with severe poverty levels and the worst unemployment rate in the country. Out of Akkar’s total population of 1.1 million, a little over 700 thousand live below the poverty line: 341 thousand Lebanese, over 266 thousand Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR since 2011, 88 thousand Palestinian refugees, and almost 12 thousand returning Lebanese expatriates.[2] Too small to be called a city, Halba is more like an urban centre.[3] Society is still structured according to hierarchical relationships which characterise the landowning, class-based social organisation of the surrounding hamlets. Urban and rural are therefore interdependent categories at multiple levels. Local people move back and forth between these two environments, trading goods and services, and visiting family split between the city and the villages.

 In this geography, the ‘city’ constitutes a spatial continuum with unclearly bounded informal assemblages, where large groups of Syrian refugees reside. During the 1980s, following demographic growth, many unauthorised houses were built in Halba’s former cotton fields, and refugees nowadays rent out some of these properties at unregulated prices.

 It is perhaps not surprising that, when people who cope with economic hardships move to cities, they often revert to rural livelihood and survival strategies, such as cultivating vegetables and fruit in the streets, as is currently happening in Syria.[4] Likewise, some of Halba’s residents still work in the surrounding fields to earn a living, as the city does not offer a large number of job opportunities. Consequently, as Akkar-based aid workers have confirmed,[5] most humanitarian livelihood programmes are centred on rural activities.

 Market places in Akkar’s towns and villages have gradually disappeared because of the lack of appropriate environmental and urban planning, the absence of public space, and worsening traffic. In this context, according to local inhabitants interviewed in winter 2017, local consumption outside of basic goods has barely increased: as a local resident affirmed during fieldwork conducted between February and March 2017, “local people are dragged by necessities, not leisure”. The refugee influx therefore increased the population without a corresponding increase in job opportunities.

Local Governance in Halba

The refugee influx resulted in the arrival of several international humanitarian agencies further stretching the capacity of local government in Akkar. The government’s decision in 2003 to upgrade Akkar from a district [qada’] of northern Lebanon to a self-standing governorate [muhafaza][6] was implemented only in 2014 when local authorities were already dealing with humanitarian governance to manage local service delivery and housing options. This raises an important and still unexplored question about the role of humanitarian systems in the process of northern Lebanon’s increasing administrative centralisation and coordination with humanitarian agencies.

 In this vein, a local development office (LDO) has been created to enhance coordination between local and international NGOs, and inter-agency meetings now take place on a regular basis.[7] According to local governors,[8] such meetings brought in INGOs to better understand the local context, therefore contributing to an amelioration and an increase in local knowledge of needs, resources and capacities.  Unfortunately this did not result in an actual coordination between the different service providers. Contrarily, some local NGOs have begun competing with each other for better access to international networks and larger funds.

The Syrian Refugee Influx in Akkar

With a population of 27 thousand local inhabitants and 17 thousand urban refugees,[9] the latter mostly reside in informal tented settlements (ITS) alongside public roads, or rent Lebanese-owned shared apartments in Halba at an average monthly cost of 400 USD. Syrian refugee families tend to rent properties in the same buildings. The ITS are subject to cyclic evictions by the Lebanese army.[10] Unregistered Syrian refugees tend to stay indoors for fear of being deported, making it challenging for UN agencies and NGOs to identify and assist them.

Although Syrian nationals in Halba still provide most of the unskilled labour for gardening, construction, cleaning, and agriculture,[11] the profile of Syrian migrant workers has changed. Those who came to Akkar prior to the Syrian crisis, were mostly young or middle-aged males.[12] They worked as seasonal labourers before returning to Syria. When the conflict broke out in Syria in the spring of 2011, some of these migrant workers brought their families to Lebanon. The local economy of Akkar, therefore, started to be formed by diverse segments of refugees, including both previous migrant workers and refugee newcomers, including refugee women, youth and children, who provide cheap labour on an irregular basis.

The Impact of Refugee Influx and Humanitarian Presence

The influx of refugees placed major economic pressure on the agricultural sector, in which Syrian nationals are legally allowed to work. Local peasants and refugees increasingly compete over the same jobs. Contrarily, Akkar’s property owners and rental agencies have seen increased international demand, because humanitarian agencies normally rent out cars and apartments to conduct their programmes in loco. What is important to illustrate is that, on the one hand, humanitarian actors have looked to Halba as a city to improve their logistic strategies and their engagement with local authorities; but, on the other, they have ignored its urban character and potentialities.

In this setting, the humanitarian system initially acted with a traditional, short-term, and urgent action-oriented focus. It neglected municipal and regional governors, local farmers and landowners, all of whom are not equipped to face emergency crises. The aid industry in Akkar, with meaningful delay, resorted to local authorities to guarantee legitimacy as a mere way to build quicker access to local populations, rather than invoking local in-depth knowledge of the territory. A deeper mutual understanding between the local governance and the humanitarian system, and their respective approaches to crisis are still lacking along with their possibility to integrate. Training local authorities and asking for their formal approval to operate have been mistaken for substantive engagement. No bilateral knowledge transfers between these systems of governance and care have occurred thus far.

The humanitarian system in Halba has initially attempted to enable individuals to cope rather than provide appropriate infrastructure. The UNDP and UKAID-funded market in Halba illustrates how the provision of public infrastructure needs to be carefully planned and coordinated with the relevant municipal authorities. The market,set in 6,000m2 of public space and with the capacity to accommodate nearly 390 traders, was inaugurated in December 2016.[13] However, it was shut down after four days as the newly appointed municipal authorities had not given permission to open the market and, moreover, the area was not served by any public transport.[14] As a result, even though UNDP had provided financial management and capacity building support to the Halba municipality, the market was short-lived. Ignoring the socio-spatial implications of the market’s construction, the actual needs and the local infrastructure ended up being unused, abandoned, and ineffective.

Humanitarian Livelihood Programming and Infrastructural Needs

Some humanitarian livelihood programmes, such as the International Rescue Committee’s coast cleaning project (from al-Abdeh to the Arida border-crossing), employ vulnerable citizens and migrants in a bid to contribute to improving the Akkar landscape and environment. Yet, the short timeframes of the humanitarian system make it difficult to sustain impact. Such a delayed encounter has shown how provisional the effects of humanitarian action can be if the aim to create well-functioning public infrastructures (waste management, access to water, etc.) comes late.[15] The international acknowledgment that pre-existing infrastructure in northern Lebanon could not cope with the massive refugee influx and create new job opportunities was also delayed. Despite the need to build access to local populations, humanitarian actors are reluctant to involve local authorities in their work. They unrealistically desire to keep humanitarian action out of local politics. Yet, their attempt at avoiding involvement in local politics and the decision to exclude public authorities, who still gate-keep urban settings to a certain extent, remain neatly political, often impeding multilateral knowledge transfers which would eventually lead to actual collaborations and exchange.

From a Place of Intervention to a More Appropriate Humanitarian Inhabitation

As the leader of the Akkar Traders’ Association reflected, “when shops shut down Halba dies”.[16] Indeed, aside from low local consumption and an overall constrained regional economy, the enhancement of the Halba business volume in the wake of humanitarian interventions has remained relatively low. Indeed, humanitarian actors have rarely resided in the city for everyday economic purposes, and based themselves in other surrounding villages where entertainment is more accessible.[17] They approached Halba as a mere place of intervention. This further points to the missed opportunities for collaboration between city authorities, longstanding service providers and humanitarian agencies in Akkar. Indeed, an urban-humanitarian encounter is not simply related to systematic programming, but it is also characterised by spontaneous daily interactions.

What follows is a list of concluding remarks that we hope will contribute to the wider urban-humanitarian debate. It is based on field research conducted in Halba in the winter of 2017:

 – The collaboration between humanitarian actors and local authorities in Lebanon has historically proved to be successful and effective in already resourceful municipalities in Lebanon (e.g. the Beirut southern suburbs and southern Lebanon after the July 2006 war)[18]. In these settings, the municipal approval of humanitarian programmes is an essential condition for intervening. For example, the ART-Gold project, promoted by UNDP and Oxfam-Italia[19] after the 2006 Israeli war on Lebanon, has in practice strengthened the municipal services destined to local residents in Beirut’s southern suburbs (especially the districts of Ghobeiry and Haret Hreik). In this regard, humanitarian resources and support should be particularly channelled into the most vulnerable municipalities. In the same vein, Lebanon-based INGOs – which normally have easy and direct access to local municipalities in order to implement service provision – should not sideline the Lebanese government, but rather demand state responsibility while supporting its capacities.

– To make humanitarian action effective, public infrastructure needs more resources than the present provision of individual-focused activities, often meant to bring refugee lives back to normality (e.g. the majority of today’s humanitarian livelihood programmes). Indeed, local markets need to be approached from a relational and social perspective, able to highlight the relevance of a collective-oriented and area-focused approach to economic sustainability.

– Local municipalities in northern Lebanon paradoxically lack the incentive to improve the city: solid infrastructure and well-functioning urban systems, may attract larger numbers of refugees from other areas in Lebanon which are less well served. As the Global North’s borders become increasingly inaccessible, preserving the status quo, rather than enhancing the capacity of local authorities and infrastructures, spares Halba and other Lebanese areas having to host even larger numbers of refugees in search of job opportunities and better quality of life. The lack of incentives for local infrastructural improvement questions the oversimplifying dictum of “working with local authorities” which nowadays overpopulates the experts’ recommendations contained in policy briefs and humanitarian accounts. Thus, the international community needs to recognise and address its failure in equally sharing humanitarian responsibility vis-à-vis the refugee influx. In fact, this failure often results in the abovementioned lack of cooperation of local authorities.

[1] J. Fiori and A. Rigon (eds.), Making Lives. Refugee Self-Reliance and Humanitarian Action in Urban Markets (London: Save the Children and UCL, 2017, p. 106).

[2] OCHA, ‘North and Akkar Governorates Profile’, 2016, available at:https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/North-Akkar_G-Profile_160804.pdf.

[3]D. Satterthwaite, The Scale and Nature of Urban Change Worldwide: 1950-2000 and Its Underpinnings, Human Settlement Discussion Paper Series (London: IIED, 2005, p. 22).

[4]See: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/syriasource/factors-driving-the-destruction-of-syria-s-natural-heritage.

[5]Interview conducted in Halba, February 2017.

[6]The region was in fact originally part of the broader North Lebanon governorate. See:http://www.localiban.org/rubrique394.html.

[7]M. Boustani, E. Carpi, et al. Responding to the Syrian Crisis in Lebanon. Collaboration between Aid Agencies and Local Governance Structures (London: IIED, 2016).

[8] Halba, 8 March 2017.

[9]Demographic data has been provided by the secretary of the Akkar governor in February 2017 and then confirmed by Save the Children – Lebanon.

[10]‘Akkar Village to Begin Evicting Syrian Refugees’, Daily Star, 19 April 2017.

[11]F. Battistin, IRC Cash and Livelihoods Support Programme in Lebanon (IRC publication, 2015).

[12]J. Chalcraft, The Invisible Cage. Syrian Migrant Workers in Lebanon (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009).

[13]UK Aid Funded Projects in Underprivileged Akkar, UK government website, 16 December 2016.

[14]Informal conversation with local residents, Halba, March 2017. Interview with the governor, Halba, 8 March 2017.

[15]For the major infrastructural needs across Lebanon after the Syrian refugee crisis see: UNHCR and REACH, ‘Multisector Community Level Assessment of Informal Settlements – Akkar Governorate, Lebanon’, Assessment Report, November 2014. To know the infrastructural projects that humanitarian agencies have undertaken, see:https://www.flandersinvestmentandtrade.com/export/sites/trade/files/market_studies/Libanon-infrastructureProjects2015.pdf.

[16] Interview conducted in Halba, March 2017.

[17] Interviews with local and international aid workers. Al-Qobaiyat (Akkar), March 2017.

[18] L. Mourad and L. H. Piron Municipal Service Delivery, Stability, Social Cohesion and Legitimacy in Lebanon (DLP and IFI-AUB Report, 2016).

[19] For more information, see: https://www.oxfamitalia.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Oxfam-Part-two.pdf.

Categories: Lebanon, Middle East, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Book Review – Humanitarian Rackets and their Moral Hazards: The Case of the Palestinian Refugee Camps in Lebanon (December 20, 2017)

http://www.globalpolicyjournal.com/blog/20/12/2017/book-review-humanitarian-rackets-and-their-moral-hazards-case-palestinian-refugee-ca

Humanitarian Rackets and their Moral Hazards: The Case of the Palestinian Refugee Camps in Lebanon by Rayyar Marron. Abingdon and New York: Routledge 2016. 188 pp., £110 hardcover 9781472457998, £36.99 paperback 9780815352570, £36.99 e-book 9781315587615

Rayyar Marron’s book provides a critique of how academic and activist accounts of Palestinian refugee camps end up reinforcing the humanitarian narrative of refugee victimhood. By underlining refugee economic and political agency, especially in the camp of Shatila in Lebanon, Marron recounts economic fraud and tactics that not only guarantee refugees’ survival and empowerment, but also seek to suggest a de-romanticised configuration of ‘refugee’ within the Middle Eastern moral economy. The author questions human suffering underlying the formulation of social and humanitarian policy. In this vein, in the scholarly literature, camps are defined not only as “sites of exilic nationalism” (p. 5), but also of resistance (p. 4). In this context, Marron contests how “Palestinianness” is addressed as a mere humanitarian cause, where refugees are passive aid recipients in need of international compassion.

The book is composed of an introduction, seven chapters, and a brief conclusion. The lengthy introduction aims to collocate the book within the framework of the de-romanticisation of vulnerability and of refugee agency: but it struggles to anticipate the core arguments. Chapter 1 intends to show how Palestinian refugees themselves seek to repackage their originally military cause as humanitarian due to the decline in funding, therefore often portraying themselves as “dispossessed peasants” (p. 44). Marron emphasises the identity crisis through which Palestinian refugees in Lebanon passed through when the Palestinian Liberation Organisation (PLO) was removed from Lebanon in 1982. Nevertheless, the chapter loses the opportunity to accurately describe what the author sees as a crucial historical moment, when Palestinians dropped the militant guerrilla culture as a public discourse to embody the exceptional case for assistance. More attention to this historical moment would have unraveled how the Palestinians’ unethical tactics to guarantee everyday life – such as smuggling and political protection rackets – are actually connected to daily grievance. The author, making the important attempt to de-romanticise the refugee category and refugee agency, however ends up focusing only on one side of the coin, providing a predominantly negative representation of camp society. A nuanced approach to examining everyday life would instead have informed the longstanding dialectics between need and greed in refugee economies.

Chapter 2 suggests the emergence of a Palestinian nationhood in connection with the pan-Islamic and pan-Arab cause (p. 50), in a complex framework of foreign state patronages. Marron specifically argues that a Palestinian sense of national belonging precedes the PLO battles, while providing shy hints of this pre-exilic society. This chapter does not provide the specificities of whom, where, and what led humanitarian definitions and practices to a negatively nuanced – but under-explained – everyday racketeering and appropriation.

In Chapter 3, the author argues that the PLO and the Palestinian political movement of Fatah radicalised the political landscape in Lebanon, seeking direct influence from within the formal institution of the parliament (p. 76), or through studentships, as cadres of Fatah enrolled as students in Lebanese universities (p. 78). By conducting robberies and soliciting funding, the PLO and Fatah militarised the civilian refugee community, raising violence in the camps. The author describes the “neopatrimonial” tendencies of Fatah and the PLO in terms of “self-enrichment” rather than the official rhetoric of the “revolution” (p. 87). Marron thus opposes the narratives that depict the so-called Palestinian revolution as an effort against Lebanese sectarian politics.

Chapter 4 highlights the challenges of organising camp society outside of patronage legacies. The pervasive influence of factional politics on refugee lives is in fact mentioned as the most deleterious issue for the Palestinians, rather than poverty or lack of infrastructure per se. On the one hand, the chapter is not too convincing in the attempt to incorporate humanitarianism into the discussion of patronage, where political groups compete for assistance, recruiting their families and allies in the capacity of beneficiaries or employees within humanitarian projects, including the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) (pp. 93-95). On the other, the author clearly shows how camp dwellers challenge the legitimacy of the popular committees, as they represent the interests of proxy states to the camp society (pp. 103-104). Marron here opposes the tendency of the scholarly literature to separate out the Palestinian oppressive sovereigns from the refugees.

Chapter 5 provides accounts of rent-seeking and illegal housing (p. 111) to shed light on camps as sources of livelihoods and proliferation, by specifying, for instance, that the percentage of Palestinian camp dwellers who own their homes (82%) is higher than Lebanese nationals (68%). Besides, Chapter 5 seeks to approach the humanitarian framework, by mentioning how NGOs are captured by competing factions in the camps (p. 116). Marron, however, is not detailed in showing how ordinary people participate in these dynamics, risking, on the one hand, a new homogenisation of refugees – shaped by negative agency – and, on the other, a new homogenisation of humanitarians, who emerge as victims that are over-burdened with responsibilities, and finding “their path disrupted by amorphous forces” (p. 124).

The role of humanitarian agencies which stems from this chapter is slightly opaque: the attentive reader is left with several questions regarding what humanitarian projects the author precisely refers to until Chapter 6, when Marron finally outlines the political economy of refugee camps and NGOs. Drawing on Horkheimer’s theory of rackets, the author largely draws on her own ethnographic experience as a teacher in a vocational school in Shatila to inform her argument that the protectors in refugee camps are also the sources of violence (p. 126). The experiential anecdote serves to illustrate how factions, influential retired community members from different political constituencies, camp residents, and humanitarians participate in the “racket society”. Likewise, Marron mentions that public services are privatised by camp factional officials to appropriate aid from outside (i.e. waste removal service, electricity grid, etc.). Nonetheless, the author often mentions dynamics of welfare power-sharing, which can surely overlap with humanitarian interventions, without telling us how she frames such overlaps and, furthermore, is too quick to label all of the service providers in the camp as “humanitarian”.

While in the first instance the author depicts the humanitarian system as caught up in the racketeering dynamics as a mere victim, in Chapter 7, she nuances their action as a “moral hazard” (p. 149) in the crystallising refugee vulnerability and as facilitating the amplification of statelessness (p. 146). Racketeering against UNRWA projects is therefore seen as the only means by which camp dwellers can access resources (p. 163). In the effort to normalise refugee camps and dissuade public narratives from ossified victimhood, Marron concludes by asserting the humanitarian exacerbation of camp racketeering dynamics but, at the same time, denouncing how humanitarian failures have been “deflected away from camp society and back onto the Lebanese state and the international community” (p. 171). The author here argues that “humanitarian assistance is not a measure that ensures collective welfare”, but rather an individual entitlement for which racketeering is necessary in order to obtain “fair shares”. I find this the most significant and intriguing argument advanced, which, probably, should have been introduced and developed earlier in the book.

Throughout the chapters, the reader struggles to identify the voices of Marron’s interviewees and her own empirical evidence. Among her second source-based historical accounts around the formation of a camp habitus oppression, the refugee individual, however, is not well visibilised: refugees seem to be given agency through the negative morality of the humanitarian rackets and political neopatrimonialism, while being unable to turn camps into civil societies.
Moreover, to me, the choice of the title remains unclear, as the humanitarian discourse and practices are not given the largest room for analysis. By the same token, the geography of the camps in Lebanon is not clearly outlined, emerging as an abstract and therefore easily homogenisable space, while most of the accounts and the camp history provided actually regard Shatila exclusively. The book’s overall imprecise structure hinders a still needed in-depth discussion of humanitarianism in camp societies.

While revealing a specific disciplinary approach is not essential in my view, the author could have been more explicit in several sections in defining her positionality while in the field and the local politics of knowledge. The book presents a very large number of key themes which therefore remain hinted at rather than properly explored, scattering the reader’s attention. On the whole, this book is primarily a historical account for social sciences scholars and researchers interested in refugee-related issues, and humanitarian practitioners. I particularly suggest this book to those who engage with the history of Palestinians in the region, and the way camp politics intertwines with the domestic politics of “host societies”. In this regard, the author provides insights from relevant first hand experience and important secondary sources, which inform the current debates on politics, refugeeness, and humanitarian governance.

Estella Carpi is a Research Associate in the Migration Research Unit, Department of Geography, University College London, working on Southern-led responses to displacement from Syria in Lebanon, Turkey, and Jordan. She received her PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Sydney (Australia) with a research project on social responses to conflict-induced displacement and humanitarian assistance provision in contemporary Lebanon. In the past, she also worked as a researcher in Egypt, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates, mostly focusing on humanitarian and welfare systems, forced migration, and identity politics.

Categories: Lebanon, Palestine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Refugee Self-Reliance: Moving Beyond the Marketplace (October, 2017)

https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/news/new-research-in-brief-on-refugee-self-reliance

I have contributed to this research in brief with my study on Halba in northern Lebanon. You can download the whole paper here: https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/publications/refugee-self-reliance-moving-beyond-the-marketplace.

The issue of how to promote refugee self-reliance has become of heightened importance as the number of forcibly displaced people in the world rises and budgets for refugees in long-term situations of displacement shrink. Self-reliance for refugees is commonly discussed as the ability for refugees to live independently from humanitarian assistance. Many humanitarian organisations perceive refugee livelihoods creation, often through entrepreneurship, as the main way to foster refugee self-reliance. Yet focusing on a purely economic definition of refugee self-reliance is problematic as it does not capture the diversity of personal circumstances or the multifarious ways that refugees live without international assistance.

Refugee self-reliance, livelihoods, and entrepreneurship have considerable salience – yet there remain notable gaps in understanding and supporting non-economic dimensions of refugee self-reliance. Academic and policy literature often focuses on technical economic outcomes at the expense of social and political dimensions and the use of holistic measurements. This latest RSC Research in Brief, titled Refugee Self-Reliance: Moving Beyond the Marketplace, presents new research on refugee self-reliance and addresses areas not commonly included in current discussions. In particular, it focuses on social and cultural, practical, and programmatic aspects of refugee self-reliance. In so doing, it rethinks the concept of refugee self-reliance and aims to contribute recommendations to help achieve positive outcomes in policy and practice.

This brief arose out of a two-day workshop at the Refugee Studies Centre on rethinking refugee self-reliance, convened by Evan Easton-Calabria and Claudena Skran (Lawrence University) in June 2017.

Categories: Africa, Lebanon, Middle East, Syria, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

Exiled Razaniyyat

Personal observations of myself, others, states and exile.

Diario di Siria

Blog di Asmae Dachan "Scrivere per riscoprire il valore della vita umana"

YALLA SOURIYA

Update on Syria revolution -The other side of the coin ignored by the main stream news

ZANZANAGLOB

Sguardi Globali da una Finestra di Cucina al Ticinese

Salim Salamah's Blog

Stories & Tales about Syria and Tomorrow

invisiblearabs

Views on anthropological, social and political affairs in the Middle East

tabsir.net

Views on anthropological, social and political affairs in the Middle East

SiriaLibano

"... chi parte per Beirut e ha in tasca un miliardo..."

Tutto in 30 secondi

[was] appunti e note sul mondo islamico contemporaneo

Anna Vanzan

Views on anthropological, social and political affairs in the Middle East

letturearabe di Jolanda Guardi

Ho sempre immaginato che il Paradiso fosse una sorta di biblioteca (J. L. Borges)